Category Archives: General

High-Speed Run Through Angeles Crest!

SoCal Sport Bikers Meetup Group recently ran Angeles Crest

SoCal Sport Bikers Meetup Group recently ran Angeles Crest

Last weekend, I met up for the first time with the SoCal Sport Bikers Meetup group and we did a long run through Angeles Crest National Forest, on the Angeles Crest Highway and Big Tujunga. I was really impressed at the quality of the riders and the way the group was run will feature in an upcoming blog post on group rides as it really set a great standard. Even though I don’t ride a sports bike and am only on a Versys 650, I’m experienced enough to hold my own alongside the faster, bigger bikes thanks to years of experience and techniques I teach as part of my rider courses.

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Following Distance And Why It’s So Important

Small following distances are accidents waiting to happen

Small following distances are accidents waiting to happen

One of the biggest components covered by the Road Strategy umbrella is “following distance”. Simply put, this is the distance at which you are “following” the vehicle directly in front of you. They talk about this in various highway codes as the “2-Second-Rule” which means the suggested minimum gap between you and the car in front should be two seconds of time. Or as long as it takes you to actually say “only a fool breaks the two second rule”. The rule is more a guide to reaction times and safe stopping distances. When applied to motorcyclists however, the 2-second rule is somewhat inadequate, largely due to a motorcycle’s small size and greater reliance on rider visibility and positioning. Let’s look at why such a premium is placed on following distance for us bikers.

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Two or four-finger braking?

Two or four-finger braking?

Two or four-finger braking?

As any graduate of one of my courses will tell you, some time spent in a quiet parking lot practicing emergency braking drills is an important part of the day. Why? Braking performance is where one of the biggest disparities in motorcycling is to be found. One disc (rotor) or two up-front, different makes of caliper and pads, ABS, non-ABS, linked brakes or non-linked – all contribute to a massive disparity in braking performance from bike-to-bike.

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5 Ways To Get Hurt (Or Die) On A Motorcycle

5 Ways To Get Hurt on a Motorcyle

With huge power to weight ratios, extreme grip and none of the protection, stability and size our 4-wheeled counterparts enjoy, riding a motorcycle is a dangerous activity. In fact, you are 27 times more likely to die in a motorcycle crash than you are in a car one. Despite the dangers, there are many things riders can do to lower their propensity for an accident or crash (and we teach them all here at SCPR), but here are our top 5 mistakes we see riders making that usually (eventually) lead to getting hurt on two wheels:

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Braking Bad – A Real-World Guide to ABS On Your Motorcycle

ABS is standard on most modern motorcycles

ABS is standard on most modern motorcycles

We all know that ABS on motorcycles has been around for a while, but what it might surprise you to know is just how long it’s been around. According to the Wiki, BMW launched an 11kg (!!) ABS system on its K100 series way back in 1988. I was only 13-years-old back then and am in my forties now…. Because the system has been around for a long time and is becoming a standard feature on most bikes nowadays, a long-held assumption I’ve had is that the vast majority of today’s riders are au fait with the system…

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Understanding The Rear Brake On Your Motorcycle

Rear-braking is an important skill for street-riding

Rear-braking is an important skill for street-riding

With the dozens of riders I’ve coached over the years, it’s always a source of bemusement to me that the two most important tools for riding a motorcycle are the two I always find used the least – counter-steering and the rear brake. Counter-steering may be considered an advanced technique but rear-braking is firmly in the “basic motorcycle control” one.

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“What Should Be My First Bike?”

This bike does 100mph in 2nd gear. Good choice for a first bike?

This bike does 100mph in 2nd gear. Good choice for a first bike?

I am fortunate enough here at SCPR to meet and train riders of all ages and experience levels. I’m always interested in folks’ path into motorcycling in terms of what machine they started on. It tells me a lot about the sort of rider they are, even before I’ve seen them turn a wheel on a bike. All riders come to SCPR on all sorts of machines – from 125cc beginners to 1300cc Harley’s, but the universal truth about almost all of them is that whatever the bike they are on, they’ve adjusted themselves to the machine to make riding it work. But it really should be the other way around. The machine should be responding to your control – not the other way around.

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Riding Two-Up: Tips for Carrying a Passenger On A
Motorcycle

Riding 2-up comes with it's own set of unique challenges

Riding 2-up comes with it’s own set of unique challenges

A student on a recent rider course recently asked for some tips on riding two-up. I gave him a couple of tips. Then a few more. And a few more. I ended up giving him so much advice I realized carrying a pillion / riding 2-up is almost a discipline by itself and certainly worthy of a blog post in its own right.

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Advanced Motorcycle Riding Tips: Cornering

Cornering, when done properly, is the most fun you can have on a motorcycle

There are so many different factors and variables that contribute to successful corner execution and reading about them on a blog isn’t ideal, mainly because of the problems involved in learning a practical skill from the written word, but since so many riders have a tendency to corner extremely badly, I thought I’d examine a few of the major areas of cornering that you can take with you and practice.

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Advanced Motorcycle Riding Tips: Counter-Steering

Speedway riders are the ultimate counter-steerers

Speedway riders are the ultimate counter-steerers

This blog post might be the first time you have come across the term “counter steering”, or maybe you’ve heard of it but think “pfffft I don’t need to do that in order to steer MY motorcycle! I just lean it over!” – but here is the honest and total truth: in order for the motorcycle to turn at higher speeds, you must counter steer, whether you realize you are doing it or not. Consciously counter-steering, and practicing it will open up a whole new world to you as a rider because it enables incredibly precise, quick and effective turning – far more than using your body to lean the motorcycle over will ever achieve.

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The Final Answer: How often should you change your oil?

aprilia_rsvr_oil_change_09

Anyone who has perused – or been a member of – a motorcycling forum will know this is probably the question most frequently asked and the one most hotly contested. Everyone has a definitive, authoritative opinion on the subject. Most seem to hold the Owners Manual in scant regard, preferring their own schedule based on x years and y experience or what the dealer recommended when they sold the bike to them…

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Death On Two Wheels – New Rider Training and State Licensing Requirements

motorcycle-crash

We get calls here at SoCalProRider from new riders who have just completed the Motorcycle Safety Program at their local state-sponsored training facility. Whilst we’re thrilled these folks are looking for further training, the checklist is usually the same – they don’t own a motorcycle, they don’t have any gear and they don’t have a learners permit. They’ve taken the MSP course perfectly legally on their driving (car) license; motorcycles and gear were provided by the school. They spent two days riding round a parking lot, got their completion certificate (which waives the DMV riding test) and are fast-tracked straight to a full, unrestricted Class M1 motorcycle endorsement.

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Advanced Rider System (SOAP)

In this post, I share details of the system of riding I’ve developed that I apply every time I get on the bike. It has allowed me to ride efficiently and safely these past fifteen years and I hope sharing it here will do the same for you.

In my opening post on this site I mention I teach the UK police pursuit method, along with my own system I’ve developed over my years of riding. I call it SOAP (Speed, Observation, Anticipation, Positioning). It’s a system of riding developed over many years that is easy to learn and can be applied easily to any riding situation.

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Getting Started with SoCal Pro Rider

Jason Humphries

Jason Humphries started SoCal Pro Rider in 2015

Hi and welcome! My name is Jason Humphries – a Brit and veteran motorcyclist with 16 years’ riding experience in Europe and North America. I moved to Southern California back in 2003. I hold full, current UK Category A and California M1 motorcycle licenses as well as a Gold Standard RoSPA Advanced Riding Certification. I currently commute to work on a Kawasaki Versys 650 and list the Honda CB500, Honda VFR 800 (Interceptor) and Harley Night Rod as previous rides.

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